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very high risk' of Parkinson's

Research has linked a particular sleep disorder called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder with a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. What characterizes this sleep problem, and can its presence be a good way to predict Parkinson's risk? These include a person's age and sex as well as some genetic factors. Still, it remains a challenge to establish early on who is likely to develop Parkinson's disease at some point in their life. However, a team of researchers from McGill University in Montreal, Canada decided to see if one particular factor — a sleep disorder called REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) — could be a good predictor of risk. This sleep problem is called RBD because it occurs during the REM phase of sleep, in which a person's body becomes effectively paralyzed. This inability to move prevents the person from physically acting out any dream that they may be experiencing and thus stops them from potentially harming themselves or others. People with RBD do not have this paralysis, which means that they end up acting out their dreams without any notion that they are doing so. Research has shown that many people with RBD go on to develop Parkinson's disease, so the McGill University team decided to find out whether an RBD diagnosis could accurately predict Parkinson's risk. As lead author Dr. Ron Postuma and colleagues explain, establishing that this sleep disorder is a good predictor of Parkinson's could, in the future, allow specialists to identify at-risk people and offer them experimental therapies that could delay or prevent the onset of this neurological condition.